Archives for Newsletter

Watch Yourselves, or Your Hearts will be coarsened

All three readings for this Sunday, the first Sunday of Advent, suggest ideas on how we should wait for the coming of the Lord: his coming through grace this Advent and his coming at the end of time. The prescriptions are relatively simple: avoid sins, pray and do not be taken by surprise. Perhaps some of us may have heard this too often and that they are too easily ignored?. The second reading calls for making progress in ‘the kind of life that we are meant to live’: loving God and loving one another.    In the Gospel, our Lord asks
Read More

No One Knows The Day Nor The Hour…

33rd Sunday in Ordinary TIme This Sunday’s Gospel (Mark 13:24-32) is part of St Mark’s Apocalyptic (i.e. end times) Discourse.  In it Our Lord speaks of the sufferings and tribulations that his disciples will experience. Our Lord speaks also of the final triumph when, the heavenly ‘Son of Man’ will come on the Last Day and gather His elect from the ends of the earth.  Our Lord uses the parable of the appearance of new leaves on a fig tree points to the certainty of bearing fruit as a analogy of the certainly of the hope for a renewed earth. 
Read More

This poor widow has put more in…..

In Biblical time, widows struggle when it comes to material wealth.  Yet in the first readings and the Gospel for this Sunday, we hear of two widows who loved God so much that they were prepared to give all they have in the service of God. As Jesus points out in the Gospel, it is not how much is given, but how much love is attached to the giving.  Most people gave of their excess, while the widows gave all they had when they could ill afford to do so.   It says much about the depth and commitment of their
Read More

The First of All Commandments…

The Scribes and the Pharisees prided themselves in their knowledge of the Law and the teaching of the Prophets, and especially in their ritual requirements.  They made it a life time practice to study the 613 precepts of the Old Testament, including numerous commentaries by rabbis on them.  In this Sunday’s Gospel (Mark 12: 28-34) a Scribe put Jesus to the test to see if He knew the laws.  He asked Jesus: ‘Which is the first of all the commandment?’.  In other words, he was asking which would be the greatest or the most important. One Lord answered with simplicity
Read More

Have Pity on me….

30th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B Last Sunday’s Gospel passage (which precedes this Sunday’s) gave us the account of the two brothers, James and John seeking places of honour.  In contrast, in this Sunday’s passage (Mark 10:46-52), we have a blind beggar asking our Lord in humility: “Son of David, Jesus, have pity on me”.  Although Bartimaeus, the blind beggar could not see, the passage shows us that he understood the nature of Jesus’ mission and identity.  He knew the prophecy that the Messiah would be of the Davidic line.  The rest of the people knew too but chose
Read More

They set off to preach repentance

  In Sacred Scriptures, we know that on many occasions, God picks and sends what appear to be very ordinary people to speak His word. We find this in this Sunday’s readings; in the First Reading, we are presented with Amos, who does not pretend to any great dignity to bolster up his mission – he is of a peasant background, a shepherd and a dresser of sycamore trees. With this simplicity, he faces the task God gave him.   In similar fashion Jesus sends the Apostles on a mission. They are ordinary men, sent out to challenge the wise and
Read More

HAVING FAITH IN THE LORD

This Sunday’s Gospel (Mark 5:21-43) offers us two miracles that Jesus performs: healing of a haemorrhaging woman and a resurrection of a child. The stories begin with Jairus, a synagogue leader, who comes not to debate with Jesus but instead seeks help for his daughter. What he does is laying his dignity aside, falling at Jesus’ feet and asking for help. The gravity of Jairus’ situation increases when the healing of the haemorrhaging woman takes place. The daughter is dying, has now been declared dead. The story of the woman is inserted into Jairus’ story with details: She comes up
Read More

HIS NAME IS JOHN

In the Catholic Church, the Feast day of a Saint is normally the day of his/her actual death (born to eternal life). However, Saint John the Baptist is honoured with two Feast days: the Birthday (June 24) and the Beheading (August 29). This Sunday, as we celebrate his Birthday, let’s try to understand something about John the Baptist. In the Gospel of Saint Luke, the annunciation story to Zechariah is described with details (Luke 1: 5-25). The story tells us that John the Baptist had been chosen by God before he was born. In Hebrew, John means “God is gracious”. Surely,
Read More

THE KINGDOM OF GOD IN EVERYDAY STORIES

  Jesus normally uses parables when preaching to his hearers. In this Sunday’s Gospel (Mark 4: 26-34) Jesus gives us one of the major themes of his preaching, namely, the coming of the Kingdom of God. Parables are everyday stories which hold a richness of wisdom. In parables, both similes and metaphors are used to persuade listeners. Jesus makes a practical and effective use of parables in a pedagogical way to inspire his audiences to make appropriate decisions because they are in response to spiritual deafness and blindness of listeners. With Jesus’ parables, there is always a requirement of a
Read More

God’s Love

The world in which we live can seem like a very dark place at times especially when tragedy strikes.  It can be incredibly difficult to find comfort in times of loss, in times of sorrow, or when loves ones are in pain. .  And how often do you here someone say “if there is a God, why did he let this happen”…… Let us Remember, God is love.  When we see with the eyes of faith, we see with the eyes of love.  Fear, anxiety, and hopelessness melt away in the light of His glory. God will one day wipe
Read More