Archives for Newsletter

We worked hard all night long and caught nothing….

St Luke’s Gospel (Luke 5:1-11) records rather late in the piece, the call of the first disciples, including some differences from the accounts in the other gospels. St Luke emphasized that the boat from which Jesus preached is “Simon’s”. St Luke, in this episode wants to emphasis the special position of Peter, as the leader of the disciples, as one who has a special mandate.   Addressed to Peter alone, in the singular,  “from now you will be catching men”.  That is the task of the First Pope: to unite all in Christ.  St Peter’s leadership in the early Church, after
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This is Joseph’s Son surely…

This Sunday’s Gospel reading continues from Last Sunday’s, whereby Jesus begins his public ministry with an inaugural discourse in the synagogue at Nazareth.   At the beginning, He receives the admiration of the people of His hometown.   But things changed quickly when He began to challenge their ideas and conviction.  Then rejection sets in…… Things have not changed much in our time.  When we hear words pleasing to us, we accept them, but when the truth challenges our conscience, we often deny it – and we become hostile to the bearer of the truth.  I would say the Catholic Church has
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The Spirit of the Lord has Been Given to me

Many Israelites of Jesus’ time expected God to send a Messiah who would liberate Israel from the political domination of the Romans.  In this Sunday’s Gospel, Jesus went into the synagogue and read the text of the prophet Isaiah (61:1-2), and told the people there and then that the Messiah, as prophesied by the prophet Isaiah, was being fulfilled in his own person and preaching. He came to liberate them from slavery (to idols, and false gods).  He announced liberation from sin, not from political subjugation.  In His time, it was indeed good news to the poor, the down trodden,
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You have Kept the Best Wine till Now

As we begin the Ordinary time of the Liturgical Year, we are taken back to the beginnings of Our Lord’s public ministry (John 2:1-11).  The passage from the Gospel of John gives us the narrative of the miracle at the wedding at Cana.  In a way, this episode links us to the feasts of the last two Sundays; the Epiphany and the baptism of Our Lord.  All three are manifestations of Our Lord’s glory. In the episode, John the Gospel writer refers to Christ’s miracles as ‘signs’.  What occurred at Cana was a sign or symbol of higher truths. The
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Blessed Are You Among Women…

4th Sunday of Advent   The fourth week of Advent always feature Mary the Mother of Our Lord, and this Sunday’s Gospel gives us the scene of the ‘Visitation’.  When Mary visited Elizabeth who was pregnant, John the Baptist leapt in the womb of Elizabeth.  The incident parallels that of Rebekah in Genesis 25.  Rebekah’s experience signalled the pre-eminence of Jacob over his older brother Esau (Gen 25:22-23).  Now, this signals the pre-eminence of Jesus over his cousin John.  When John grew up he tells us he is not worthy to remove the sandal strap of Jesus.   The intention
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Our True Joy

3rd Sunday of Advent   The liturgical theme of the Third Sunday of Advent is JOY. The first and second readings invite us to rejoice and exult with all our hearts because God is present in our midst. We should be joyous because the Lord Jesus is coming to bring us salvation. This invitation of encountering Jesus is for everyone and should be answered daily, as in His first Apostolic Exhortation: Evangelii Gaudium (The joy of the Gospel), Pope Francis writes: “I invite all Christians, everywhere, at this very moment, to a renewed personal encounter with Jesus Christ, or at
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Watch Yourselves, or Your Hearts will be coarsened

All three readings for this Sunday, the first Sunday of Advent, suggest ideas on how we should wait for the coming of the Lord: his coming through grace this Advent and his coming at the end of time. The prescriptions are relatively simple: avoid sins, pray and do not be taken by surprise. Perhaps some of us may have heard this too often and that they are too easily ignored?. The second reading calls for making progress in ‘the kind of life that we are meant to live’: loving God and loving one another.    In the Gospel, our Lord asks
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No One Knows The Day Nor The Hour…

33rd Sunday in Ordinary TIme This Sunday’s Gospel (Mark 13:24-32) is part of St Mark’s Apocalyptic (i.e. end times) Discourse.  In it Our Lord speaks of the sufferings and tribulations that his disciples will experience. Our Lord speaks also of the final triumph when, the heavenly ‘Son of Man’ will come on the Last Day and gather His elect from the ends of the earth.  Our Lord uses the parable of the appearance of new leaves on a fig tree points to the certainty of bearing fruit as a analogy of the certainly of the hope for a renewed earth. 
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This poor widow has put more in…..

In Biblical time, widows struggle when it comes to material wealth.  Yet in the first readings and the Gospel for this Sunday, we hear of two widows who loved God so much that they were prepared to give all they have in the service of God. As Jesus points out in the Gospel, it is not how much is given, but how much love is attached to the giving.  Most people gave of their excess, while the widows gave all they had when they could ill afford to do so.   It says much about the depth and commitment of their
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The First of All Commandments…

The Scribes and the Pharisees prided themselves in their knowledge of the Law and the teaching of the Prophets, and especially in their ritual requirements.  They made it a life time practice to study the 613 precepts of the Old Testament, including numerous commentaries by rabbis on them.  In this Sunday’s Gospel (Mark 12: 28-34) a Scribe put Jesus to the test to see if He knew the laws.  He asked Jesus: ‘Which is the first of all the commandment?’.  In other words, he was asking which would be the greatest or the most important. One Lord answered with simplicity
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