Posts by OLV Parish

Increase Our Faith…..

I have always been fond of the opening paragraph of this Sunday’s Gospel passage (Luke 17:5-10); “The apostles said to the Lord, ‘Increase our faith.’ The Lord replied, ‘Were your faith the size of a mustard seed you could say to this mulberry tree, “Be uprooted and planted in the sea”, and it would obey you.” If we could “measure” faith, it would be more in its ‘quality’ than in ‘quantity’.   But, even if we could quantify it like, an “ounce” of faith, or the “size of a mustard seed”, the point is, with the right attitude, God can work
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He is God, not of the dead, but of the living

It is  of  the  essence  of  the Christian faith that when death comes, life is changed, not ended.  When we die, our soul leaves the body and is before God for judgement awaiting the day of the Resurrection (‘of the body’, as we recite in the Apostles’ Creed). In Catholic theology, ‘the unity of soul and body is so profound that one has to consider the soul to be the “form” of the body: i.e., it is because of its spiritual soul that the body made of matter becomes a living, human body; spirit and matter, in man, are not two natures
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26th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Twenty Sixth Sunday of Ordinary Time Year C Good things came your way…. The above chart shows the incredible wealth the top ten riches people have.  While I do not know if they have been generous in helping others, this Sunday’s Gospel warns us (Luke 16:19-31) what material wealth can do to us: i.e., we can be blind to the plight of others.  We might not be the top ten richest, but most of us are nevertheless much better off than others. In the parable given by Jesus, the rich man had an opportunity to use his wealth in the
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He was lost and is found

All three readings for this Sunday focus attention on Divine forgiveness, and of course, our human waywardness that is in need of forgiveness.  Each reading considers this notion of Mercy from a somewhat different angle.  In the Gospel, God seeks out sinners like the shepherd who seeks the single lost sheep, and like the woman who searches for the one lost coin, and like the father who runs out to embrace the prodigal son.  In all the cases, the one who did the seeking did so rather ‘un-calculatingly’.  Love is at the centre of mercy – and love in not
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Try your best to enter by the narrow door…

In this Sunday’s Gospel passage (Luke 13:22-30), Jesus is on his way to Jerusalem to complete His mission: to die for us, to open the door of heaven for us.  He is asked whether only a few will be saved.  He does not give a direct answer but he goes on to speak about the personal effort that is demanded from those who wish to enter the kingdom. ‘Try your best to enter by the narrow door, because, I tell you, many will try to enter and will not succeed”.  What does Jesus mean by this expression?   He is the
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I am not here to bring peace….!

“Do you suppose that I am here to bring peace on earth?”, this is the question Jesus posed in this Sunday’s Gospel.  He then answered it Himself; “No, I tell you, but rather division” !!! When we recall that Jesus declared that Peacemakers are blessed (Mat. 5 :9), and that He prayed for the peace of His followers (John 14 :27), and that one of the fruits of His Spirit is peace (Gal. 5 :22), we may find this reading somewhat surprising. What could He have meant by saying that he came not to bring peace but division? The division
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Lord, Teach us to Pray

We have one of the disciples of John the Baptist to thank for the prayer given to us in this Sunday’s Gospel (Luke 11:1-13).  He asked Our Lord, saying; “Lord, teach us to pray“.  In the ‘Our Father’, we are given a blueprint of how to pray, or at least, how to shape the content of our prayers.   Some people want to pray but do not know how.  Methods and techniques of prayer have always been in demand and, in recent times, the variety on offer has multiplied. The Catechism of the Catholic Church, of which every committed Catholic
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“Go, and do the same yourself’

In the Gospel (Luke 10:25-37) for this Sunday’s Mass, Jesus gives us the exquisite parable of the Good Samaritan.  His message is powerful; that neither nationality nor religion nor race should set a limit to our responsibility of coming to the aid of another human being.  To grasp better his teachings, one needs to be aware that there is irreconcilable hostility, as mutual as it was deep, that marked the relationship, between Samaritans and Jews.   The Samaritan showed by his action that he correctly recognised ‘a neighbour’ even in the hated Jew. Human fraternity imposes duties that extend beyond the
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….. ask the Lord of the harvest to send labourers to his harvest.

The message that “the kingdom of God is near” has been the message since the days of John the Baptist.  The Baptist proclaimed it to the crowds who came to the Jordan.  Jesus taught it at His first appearance; and now (in this Sundays’s Gospel passage) the disciples are sent out to spread this as the keynote of their teaching (Luke 10:1-12, 17-20). Unfortunately it took a long time even for the disciples to understand what “the Kingdom of God” really means. They wanted some sort of visible power and were naively thrilled at having the power of exorcism.   A
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